Radon Home Information

Home Sales

Ohio has no law requiring owners to test and mitigate homes for radon prior to sale or rental of a property. However, sellers must disclose on the Residential Property Disclosure Form the previous or current presence of radon. For more information pertaining to homeowners, see the EPA’s Home Buyer’s and Seller’s Guide to Radon.

Rental Properties

The Ohio Revised Code does not require rental residential property owners to disclose to tenants the previous or current presence of radon. However, tenants are not prohibited from conducting radon tests in their own homes (ORC 3701-69-02, B (2)).

Some protections exist for tenants in HUD financed and FHA-insured properties. In response to the Federal Radon Action Plan, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has been incorporating radon testing and mitigation into HUD programs. As of January 31, 2013, new FHA insured mortgage applications were covered under a HUD Office of Multifamily Development Radon Policy making a radon assessment part of the Environmental Review.

Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) are not required to test or mitigate radon. “PHAs are strongly encouraged to proactively plan and complete radon testing and follow-up with mitigation strategies if possible, especially when excessive radon levels are present” (from HUD Notice PIH 2013-06 (HA))

The EPA’s A Radon Guide for Tenants offers general information for tenants concerned about radon.

Radon-Resistant New Construction

Radon-resistant new construction refers to building a new home in such a way that the home resists radon getting into the home. The additional cost is estimated by the EPA between $250 and $750. Ohio has no radon-resistant construction code but some localities in Ohio including the cities of Dublin and Grove City have adopted the code (International Residential Code Appendix F).

The City of Columbus has adopted green/universal design building standards and contractor requirements for residential projects awarded federal funds through the City or Franklin County. The program is called AWARE (Accessible, Water Conservation, Air Quality, Resource Conscious and Energy Efficient). The standards are applicable to both new construction and housing rehabilitation.

The green building program of the US Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED v.4, requires radon-resistant new construction and testing and mitigation of radon in existing properties under certain conditions if properties are located in EPA radon zone 1.

Home Sales

Ohio has no law requiring owners to test and mitigate homes for radon prior to sale or rental of a property. However, sellers must disclose on the Residential Property Disclosure Form the previous or current presence of radon. For more information pertaining to homeowners, see the EPA’s Home Buyer’s and Seller’s Guide to Radon.

Rental Properties

The Ohio Revised Code does not require rental residential property owners to disclose to tenants the previous or current presence of radon. However, tenants are not prohibited from conducting radon tests in their own homes (ORC 3701-69-02, B (2)).

Some protections exist for tenants in HUD financed and FHA-insured properties. In response to the Federal Radon Action Plan, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has been incorporating radon testing and mitigation into HUD programs. As of January 31, 2013, new FHA insured mortgage applications were covered under a HUD Office of Multifamily Development Radon Policy making a radon assessment part of the Environmental Review.

Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) are not required to test or mitigate radon. “PHAs are strongly encouraged to proactively plan and complete radon testing and follow-up with mitigation strategies if possible, especially when excessive radon levels are present” (from HUD Notice PIH 2013-06 (HA))

The EPA’s A Radon Guide for Tenants offers general information for tenants concerned about radon.

Radon-Resistant New Construction

Radon-resistant new construction refers to building a new home in such a way that the home resists radon getting into the home. The additional cost is estimated by the EPA between $250 and $750. Ohio has no radon-resistant construction code but some localities in Ohio including the cities of Dublin and Grove City have adopted the code (International Residential Code Appendix F).

The City of Columbus has adopted green/universal design building standards and contractor requirements for residential projects awarded federal funds through the City or Franklin County. The program is called AWARE (Accessible, Water Conservation, Air Quality, Resource Conscious and Energy Efficient). The standards are applicable to both new construction and housing rehabilitation.

The green building program of the US Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED v.4, requires radon-resistant new construction and testing and mitigation of radon in existing properties under certain conditions if properties are located in EPA radon zone 1.

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